J’adore Paris Végétalien

It’s my last day in Paris and I am reflecting, in admiration, upon all of the amazing vegan food and culture here. To anyone who thinks it would be difficult to be vegan in Paris, I say nonsense. There were more restaurants than I had time to visit, some of the best tasting vegan cheeses and felafel, amazing chocolat noir, and any cafe or restaurant I stumbled across understood and offered at least a few vegan options.

• I stopped in to have a meal at the bustling SOYA: Cantine Bio restaurant in the 11th district. The restaurant was vegetarian, with mostly vegan options. I enjoyed some of the best vins naturels et issus de la Bio-dynamie I’ve had, a table-red that almost fizzed it was so rich with minerals, yet there was no bitterness or bite. The waitstaff was delightful and accommodating with my terrible attempts at speaking French. I enjoyed an incredible starter that was a pair savory, creamy spreads: beet and leek and then two bowls featuring seasoned quinoa with fried tofu, and a hot potage de legueme. For dessert, a green tea mousse!

• Another great spot was Voy Alimento, a super-foods charged, Brazilian-inspired restaurant and market tucked into rue des Vinaigriers. A spicy, cocoa tea and a rich acai smoothie started us off, along with a sampler or dried fruits, raw cacao, and various corn crackers. Then a big plate of superfood-seasoned vegetables, rice, stewed pumpkin, spreads, and tofu, along with some delicate pumpernickel flat-bread. For desert there was a simple fruit kebab with aloe and a rich chocolate mousse with coconut.

•  The Marais is famous for art, fashion, Jewish culture, gay culture, cafes, bookstores and bars. The line around the block to get felafel at Chez Marianne was a good indication of how popular they are. And the felafel avec humus with peppers, eggplant and pickles? Delicious.

• Unexpectedly, while wandering the narrow streets among art galleries, I stumbled upon Guen Mai on Rue de l’Abbaye, and enjoyed a savory vegan scramble tart and a sweet apple and almond tart along with an organic beer and a big, fresh carrot juice.

 

 

Written by joshuakatcher

Joshua Katcher started The Discerning Brute in 2008 as a resource for men who want to make intelligent decisions concerning their lifestyles. With a focus on “fashion, food & etiquette for the ethically handsome man”, The Discerning Brute produces expert, essential content and boldly takes a stand. Brave GentleMan, the integrated, eCommerce brother-site of The Discerning Brute was launched in 2011 and features “principled attire” and “smart supplies” handpicked for informed indulgence.
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  • Kate

    Where did you stay?

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  • Karoumy

    Everyone recommends Chez Marianne. I didn’t think it was that good. It wasn’t even the best falafel I had in Paris. 

    I hope you had a chance to sit down at a good Lebanese restaurant because they’re everywhere in Paris and I have yet to stumble upon one that wasn’t good. 

  • Karoumy

    Everyone recommends Chez Marianne. I didn’t think it was that good. It wasn’t even the best falafel I had in Paris. 

    I hope you had a chance to sit down at a good Lebanese restaurant because they’re everywhere in Paris and I have yet to stumble upon one that wasn’t good. 

  • Karoumy

    Everyone recommends Chez Marianne. I didn’t think it was that good. It wasn’t even the best falafel I had in Paris. 

    I hope you had a chance to sit down at a good Lebanese restaurant because they’re everywhere in Paris and I have yet to stumble upon one that wasn’t good.