Largest Duck Farm Raided After Investigation

Chickens and turkeys aren’t the only animals who are factory farmed in the United States. A new Mercy For Animals investigation at one of the nation’s largest duck factory farms exposes sickening cruelty and criminal neglect of ducks.

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The investigation documents:

• Baby ducklings having the tips of their beaks burned with red-hot metal
• Ducks suffering from illness and injuries without proper veterinary care
• Birds trapped in or under the wire cage flooring left to slowly suffer and die
• Ducks having their throats cut while still conscious and able to feel pain

Candle Café Holiday Cooking

NYC’s award-winning Candle Café releases a holiday cookbook, packed full of over 100 mouth-watering recipes like Pumpkin Cheesecake with Apple Cider Reduction and Braised Cranberry-Orange Tofu.

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Pick a Phobia, any Phobia!

By Sid Garza-Hillman

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A few weeks ago I had the pleasure of meeting The Discerning Brute/Joshua Katcher in person. He had been a guest (via Skype) on my podcast only weeks prior, and just by chance was able to come up to the Stanford Inn during a trip to Northern California. I head up the Stanford Inn’s Wellness Center and am the Nutritionist/Health Coach there.

Joshua, his partner James, and I sat down for dinner, and while we talked about many things (fashion included, though why anyone would wear anything other than rolled up 501’s and white t-shirts is beyond me. Maybe I should be more discerning.), the subject of protein came up. Not because any of us—all plant-based—were concerned with protein in the least, but because working at a vegan resort whose clientele are overwhelmingly NOT vegan, I am constantly asked the big protein question—where do vegans get their protein?

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A couple times a week I hang out and walk through the inn’s restaurant and talk to guests. Almost nightly I get the protein question and am there to hopefully dissipate some of the fear around it. I was relating this to Joshua and James and we all decided it should probably be a phobia. And that’s when, through obviously divine inspiration, it hit: PROTEDEFIPHOBIA—the fear of protein deficiency. I think we nailed it, and now just have to figure out the hoops we have to jump through to make it official. Is there a phobia department of the patent office? Should we ‘tm’ it for now (i.e. protedefiphobia™)? Oh, the possibilities. I’m so excited about it that it must be something that deep down I’ve always wanted and finally got: I’m a co-owner of a beautiful baby phobia!

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And yet, a reality check. Fear of protein deficiency is very real. As a species we are designed to protect ourselves and to survive the best we can. Often times corporations/companies/industries feed on this instinct in order to drive sales. The animal food industry is no exception. They succeed every time they convince someone that he or she will suffer greatly without intense amounts of animal protein. However, there are a few pesky facts that hurt their bottom line: 1) whole plants are full of protein 2) the human body performs best on a higher carbohydrate diet (not refined/processed carbohydrates, but whole plant ones) and finally, 3) more and more professional athletes are actually performing and recovering better after switching to whole plants. In my practice I devote a substantial amount of time and effort minimizing the fear around protein. But that’s one of the best parts of my job—helping people be LESS afraid. Less fear, more happiness and health. Pretty simple equation.

So, to those with protedefiphobia™, rest assured, help is on the way. It’s located in the produce section of groceries stores around the world.

12 Things to Click

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The Lusty Vegan Interview

ChefAyinde

Chef Ayinde Howell’s new book, The Lusty Vegan, co-authored by Zoe Eisenberg, is a delicious, fun, sexy and indulgent cookbook that focuses on innovative recipes with savvy relationship advice for people that may not see pie-to-pie. Yours Truly gives some of his own relationship advice on page 89! I’ve had the lucky opportunity to both work with Ayinde as a featured chef, and eat his delectable creations at more than one glitzy event. I went back for seconds. And thirds.  With his new book hitting the shelves, I got the inside scoop on what makes the perfect recipe for a book about what it takes to keep on loving food and each other.

Joshua Katcher: Which two recipes from your new book are your personal favorite?
Ayinde Howell: Orange Cream Stuffed French Toast and the Hearts of Palm Lobster Roll

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Hearts of Palm Lobster Roll, from The Lusty Vegan

JK: Why is food such an issue for people in relationships or dating?
AH: Because it’s physical evidence that you agree or really disagree on a pretty key element of life. At just about every meal it can be an easy source of conflict or reassurance. The key is to have understanding, mutual respect and good vegan food. I try to address as much of these as possible with my co-author in TLV. And provide 80+ recipes for the eating part.

JK: What have you learned about relationships from writing this book?
AH: That I have been selfish in the past and didn’t know how to compromise. But I do now. Really! It’s a two way street and when we talk about building a life with someone there is a lot to consider. So if it’s a serious one, be open.

JK: List 10 ingredients you could never live without.LustyVegan
AH: 1. Flavored oils, truffle, sesame, olive etc.
2. vinegars, balsamic, cider, rice etc.
3. sage
4. powdered herbs
5. an all purpose seasoning, I make my own but old bay is nice and a good masala curry
6. cashews
7. vegan butter
8. organic veggies
9. tamari sauce
10. flour

JK: I love your point in the book to “let the food do the talking”. I feel like this can be applied to a lot of things. Tell us about an experience you’ve had where your food did the talking.
AH: Mostly it’s from when I worked as an executive chef in Manhattan, I would sit in the dinning room during lunch and watch as vegans would drag their non vegan co-workers to the vegan cafe. Witnessing their faces go from skepticism… to that silent fork… to plate-clanking joy never got old. I saw that worked so much better than any pamphlet or  attempt at convincing.

JK: I’ve met some people who don’t like art, don’t like kids… but would you date someone who didn’t like indulging in good food?
AH: So interesting, I’d have to say no. As a chef I get a lot of inspiration from the person I’m dating pleasing her palate and surprising those testbeds is a such a fun thing.

JK: I love the theme of the book and its inclusiveness. What kind of feedback have you been getting? Any haters?
AH: Well we release on Oct7th, I’m sure there are some haters out there. My co-writer Zoe Eisenberg was called vegan whore for dating her meat eating BF by one of our ieatgrass.com commenters (at least it was a vegan whore).

JK: When are you opening a restaurant and when will I ever get to have your Mac-n-Yease again?
AH: Ha! Post writing this book I am putting together a plan and team so I can create the space I want in the the best way! I will let you know sir!

JK: What do you have your sights set on for the next year?
AH: More TV stuff, I am working on merging all my talents together and hitting the world with veganism in ways they have not seen before.

JK: What’s the best way for people to get your book?
AH: Most book stores or Amazon.com.