PARSONS hosts “Real Rebels” Fashion Panel

I’m honored to be included in the upcoming panel on fashion rebels at Parson’s The New School for Design. The panel is moderated by designer John Bartlett and features Karina Kallio, Joshua Katcher, Leanne Mai-ly Hilgart and Stephanie Nicora Johns. Unfortunately, it’s not open to the public, but if you’re a student at Parsons or The New School, please come!

real_rebels_poster

 

ROMBAUT AW14/15

rombautaw1415b

ROMBAUT‘s two previous menswear collections received positive acclaim from press and are stocked at a selection of forward-thinking niche boutiques such as Comme des Garçons (Tokyo), Layers (London), Glossy (Shanghai) , Stijl (Brussels), The Number 4 (Kuwait), ODD (New York), Paris Oracle (Rome), to name a few.

For Autumn Wintter 2014/15, ROMBAUT introduces ROMBAUT OBJECTS, a new capsule collection that includes bags and small accessories. Their philosophy and convictions remain the same.  “We reflect the image of a generation that has to grow up in insecure times and which tries to create its own path. We question everything, make informed choices and fight for our ideas. As strong evolutions always come from culture, we’ve been inspired by movements that changed the history of art. Our models’ minimal shapes, fabric contrasts and clean lines refer to the concepts of collage, layering and forward thinking, and respect the fact that every detail is meaningful.”


http://www.rombaut.com/img/aw14/1.jpg

Artisanally crafted in Italy, ROMBAUT shoes represent a unique crossover between high fashion and ecological awareness. Eliminating toxic and animal-derived substances in the process. ROMBAUT represents more than just a shoe, but a directional fashion concept designed for a more balanced future.

WINTER AW1415
rombautaw1415a

ROMBAUT takes artisanal shoemaking to a natural extreme, while ROMBAUT OBJECTS uses sustainable materials that are strong, durable, and more adapted for every day wear.

Prospector, Treeline, Uniforms for the Dedicated

http://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0208/4178/products/IMG_4906_1024x1024.jpg?1555DukeThe Kingsley http://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0208/4178/products/xIMG_5491_1024x1024.jpg?1555

treelinecheeseplateTreeline-hardTreeline-Scallion-2

Treeline Cheese is a cashew-based, aged, artisan cheese that ripens in upstate New York’s Catskill mountains. Whether you stuff a date with it, eat it on sliced fruit, mix it into rice or pasta, or use it to top-off any dish that would call for a fine cheese, it seems there’s no way to go wrong with fine vegan cheeses. Sometimes, though, nothing is better than enjoying a glass of wine while simply letting one small wedge at a time slowly melt in your mouth.

 

A Word on Wallets

by D. R. Hildebrand

I was about ten, maybe eleven years old, the first (and only) time my mother bought me a wallet.  The store sold leather jackets, leather purses, leather everything, all at very inexpensive prices.  As she paid I asked her, unaware, where this thing leather came from.  She hesitated a moment, probably caught off guard, then told me, “from animals.”  As someone who grew up vegetarian, not because of my parents but because of my stubborn older siblings who demanded it, there was no doubt my mother knew exactly what I thought of this suddenly morose, unappealing gift.  Before I could even utter a rebuttal she looked at me with frustration, and a little guilt, and said, “Well what other options are there?  It’s leather or nothing.”

I made that wallet last through college.

Fortunately, twenty years later my mother’s question has a host of answers.  Leather is passé and the alternatives are abundant.  The assortment below, by no means exhaustive, is intended simply to highlight a few of the materials and styles currently available, and to hint at what innovation will bring in the future.

My first vegan wallet was the National Bi-Fold, a very popular item from the Vegan Collection.  It had a leather-like look and feel and was often mistaken for leather.  Unfortunately, it wore out like leather too.  Others have found theirs to be quite resilient however and if a likeness to leather is the aesthetic you desire then this, or one of the company’s other designs, is worth considering.  Prices range from $24 to $32, with MooShoes carrying select styles in-store.

TheVeganCollection

Dynomighty Design, intended to “accentuate the modern urban lifestyle,” by Terrence Kelleman offers a tear-resistant, water-resistant, expandable, and recyclable wallet at an affordable $15.  The material is tyvek, which makes for an extremely lightweight, almost unnoticeable presence.  Dynomighty’s only drawback comes for those who carry extra credit cards, piles of receipts, photos, condoms, business cards, or anything else that will strain it.  For the minimalist, though, it is a gem.  Find it online at Alternative Outfitters or in a Whole Foods supermarket.

Dynomighty

For the past year I’ve carried a US-made wallet by HARVEYS.  This California-based maker, founded by the couple Dana and Melanie Harvey, offers no visible mention of being vegan—something I actually kind of like.  Each item, though, is made of seat belts and has a fashionable yet conscientious look.  The wallet, Black Label, costs $48 and is as reliable as, well, a seat belt.

Harveys

Additional options include: Franklin by Alchemy Goods, which makes wallets from reclaimed bicycle inner tubes for $29; hemp wallets by Rawganique ranging from $4 to $17; the effortless yet resilient Flowfold at $30, crafted in Maine from the sailcloth of boats; RAGGEDedge Gear, with badass wallets made of carbon fiber and Kevlar at $60; handmade by “dudes in California,” Couch Guitar Straps offers Jet Age, a funky $30 vintage-style wallet manufactured from vinyl; and for $74 any number of the sleek and über-chic stainless steel wallets by Stewart/Stand.

ANNTIAN SS13

Anntian03

Anntian’s spring/summer 2013 collection is a modern-psychadelic trip; an optimistic cacaphony combining explosions of organic textures and abstract patters with hard lines, photographic prints and bold blocks of soft colors. The textiles shown here are organic cotton, cotton and linen. Designers Anne Hilken and Christian Kurt are based in Berlin, and started designing in 2006.

While their entire collection is not vegan (they do use some wool and leather),  all of the looks here are suitable for vegans. You can check their shoplist for locations to buy, or buy online.

Anntian02Anntian04  Anntian05 Anntian01