Al Gore’s Veganism: Bananas, If Not Evil

AlGoreBananas

According to Forbes, former Vice President and environmentalist filmmaker Al Gore (An Inconvenient Truth) has done, for at least a few months now, what a lot of leaders who are concerned with any combination of the environment, animals and their health have done – he’s embraced a vegan diet. The article that revealed his new diet was about Hampton Creek Foods, creators of Just Mayo, Eat The Dough, and other products that utilize an exciting futuristic egg successor that is being invested in by the like of Bill Gates. In the article, Forbes says: “Newly turned vegan Al Gore is also circling,”.

This was the first mention of Gore’s switch to veganism, and since then it’s caused a flurry of press and speculation from the LA Times and NPR, to HuffPo and The Washington Post. While none of the articles themselves are scathing, one quick look at the comments section reveals a lot of people who think Gore is bananas, if not evil. “Don’t read the comments,” they say. But whenever a powerful male goes vegan and it makes the news, the haters seem to crawl out and launch into a flurry of what can be sorted out as: defense of mainstream masculinity, climate-change denial, pseudo-expert study citations, anger at the Clinton administration (Bill aspires toward a plant-based diet), proclamations for their love of meat, and general resistance to change. So in this case, if you want to LOL, do read the comments. Here are some of my favorite Gore-Hater comments from the last few days:

  • Bruno26: What about eyelash mites, Demodex folliculorum, vegans kill these poor little animals indiscriminately with the simple rub of their eyelid, who sticks up for these animals? or are you saying some animals are more worthy than others?
  • Ron_Hi: We already know how this twatwaffle has ripped off the “Green” movement selling Energy Credits to allow companies to pollute. Since he is going vegan, I have an suggestion of where he can stick his next carrot.
  • CliveBixby: How do you know if someone’s a vegan? Don’t worry….they’ll tell you.
  • libertysanders: So while Gore flies around burning more fossil fuel then I’ll use in my lifetime giving speeches about imaginary “global warming” he’s eating bean sprouts? Wow, that is SO green! Be still, my beating heart!!
  • ohiomark: With his hoax falling apart, NOW he stops eating meat?
  • jgtch: Bill Clinton and Al Gore going vegan to extend their time on this planet. Think I will eat steak twice a day and take up smoking.
  • newwtrick:If Al Gore goes vegan the way he went green, there are many cows who better watch out.
  • • gayle5: Let’s do a survey of how many vegans have had abortions.
  • newg8tr: It would be an even bigger contribution to the universe if he just went ahead and died.
  • bgh308:‘Bout time ole AL lost some weight. He invented the internet and man made global warming–now he’s gone and invented veggie diets!
  • FaunaAndFlora:Al Gore flies back and forth from his 10,000 square foot mansion in Belle Meade, Tennessee to his luxury apartment in San Francisco, or to New York, New York where he has a standing reservation at the Regency. For holidays and special occasions, his family flies in from the east and west coasts to gather at the Gore farm in Carthage, Tennessee, yet the best Mr. Gore can do to reduce his own carbon footprint is to go vegan?  Really? How about cutting back on all those frequent flyer miles? Or turning that Belle Meade mansion into a multi-family? After all, Mr. Gore could reduce his carbon footprint by living in the guest house. Even better, he could live on the Gore family farm. I’ve been to Carthage, Tennessee. It’s good grazing land. Since Mr. Gore already leases his pastures to local beef farmers, there’s no reason why he couldn’t use that land to raise a steer for his own consumption. The beef from that animal would have a much smaller carbon footprint than buying quinoa from Peru.

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For only 24 hours, dudes and anyone into menswear will get a huge 50% off their orders for VAUTE coats! If you’d rather check the new samples out in person first, this very limited run of sustainable, vegan, made-in-NYC coats can be seen this week and weekend at the VAUTE shop in Brooklyn. (Psst, the model is Christopher, one-half of the famed Dun-Well Doughnuts… so yes, you can eat tons of award-winning vegan doughnuts and still be a model.)

http://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0186/4694/products/New_Joaquin_3_1024x1024.jpg?5399
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John Bartlett Shoes, Nicora Johns & Bill Clinton

• Designers John Bartlett and Ruthie Davis have collborated, as WWD reported,  on a small range of very cool vegan shoes. Two unisex sneakers and one women’s pump featuring Bartlett’s signature Tiny Tim print will hit the designers respective online stores this January. Ten percent of sales will go to Bartlett’s Tiny Tim Rescue Fund, which provides resources to organizations that help treat and find homes for shelter animals.
• Speaking of very cool vegan shoes, designer Stephanie Fryslie of the line Nicora Johns is hand-making some rad vegan kicks (Modeled above by AFI front man Davey Havok) in Los Angeles with a focus on bringing jobs back here to the US of A. Fryslie is currently raising funds to launch her production via Kickstarter, so check it out!
Bill Clinton (Ben Baker)
• Former President Bill Clinton is in the news again advocating a vegan diet. In a recent interview with AARP, Clinton stated that, after being a vegan for over three years:
“I just decided that I was the high-risk person, and I didn’t want to fool with this anymore. And I wanted to live to be a grandfather,” says Clinton. “So I decided to pick the diet that I thought would maximize my chances of long-term survival.”
…”the way we consume food and what we consume” are driving the unsustainable level of health care spending in America. To truly change the conditions that lead to bad habits and poor health, he warns, “we have to demand it by changing the way we live. You have to make a conscious decision to change for your own well-being, and that of your family and your country.”

The Imperfect Vegan

by D.R. Hildebrand

Not long ago I wrote an editorial for this site titled “The Meaning of Meat.”  I began by recounting how, at an airport, I had been reminded of the absurd pricing system at restaurants: items that contain no meat or dairy very often cost the exact same as comparable items that do.  The observation was meant merely as a preface to the broader topic of government subsidies, but apparently moved some readers more than the focus itself.  “Fuck that,” one person commented.  “Support 100% vegan establishments and tell your omni ‘friends’ to suck it up.”  Another wrote, “You made that decision alone to live that lifestyle.  Knowing there are minimal vegan options out there, you should have brown bagged it.  Such an entitled attitude…

We could talk for days about how shameful I am for being dropped off at an undersized airport hours before my flight, waiting even longer for an unforeseeable delay, and not having carried nearly enough granola bars—preferably homemade—with me across the country, only to end up getting hungry and—let the flogging begin—ordering a vegan meal from a non-vegan vendor.  Yet perhaps we could ask ourselves why, instead, in the bigger picture of our ailing society and our otherwise mutual goals to heal it, this is such a big deal.

Shortly after I read these responses I was on the subway and found myself listening to one vegan snobbishly correcting another.  “Jason,” the one said, “you’re not a vegan.  You’re just vegan.”  Jason looked dumbfounded.  He hadn’t realized that the vegan elite decree our parts of speech.  It is not acceptable just to be an adjective.  You have to be a noun.  Being vegan must be every molecule of who you are.  It must define you categorically.  If it only describes you—in part—then you can kiss being worthy goodbye.

Hillary Rettig wrote an exceptional piece on an analogous topic for Vegsource last year called “The Rise of the Nonperfectionist Veganism.”  She focused, in great detail, on some vegans’ abrasive treatment of vegetarians and omnivores and on the way they internalize their own flaws.  In adding to Ms. Rettig’s assessment, I say some are no less critical of, and nasty to, each other.  The choice to be judgmental, absolutist, arrogant and unfriendly instead of cordial, encouraging, measured, and kind sets us back, not ahead.  It almost reminds me of a particular political party in the United States right now that is so hell-bent on universal conservativism that anyone within the party who isn’t berating their liberal-leaning colleagues they ostracize.  Last time I checked, this approach was not working.  Voters have stopped listening to anything they say for it is crass, premeditated, and void of any basic individuality.

There is a restaurant in Philadelphia, Govinda’s, that I support just about every time I am there.  The food is delicious and, nearly as important, it attracts one of the most racially, economically, socially diverse groups of patrons possible—a characteristic, true or false, not often associated with the vegan community.  Govinda’s has been around since the 1980’s when veganism was anything but cool, and it is likely due to the restaurant’s presence that Sweet Freedom Bakery opened half a block away in 2010, further strengthening the city’s vegan visibility.  Govinda’s, however, is not strictly vegan.  It offers both a dairy and a non-dairy cheese.  Yet with all that Govinda’s has done to advance veganism, do we spurn it for its one “imperfection?”

Govinda's

Similarly, there is an Italian restaurant in Manhattan that dates back to 1908.  It stands alongside the vegan hot spot Angelica Kitchen, and a few years ago it nearly closed due to weak business.  In an attempt to remake itself, the owner decided to create a complete vegan menu—right down to the homemade seitan and cannolis—to complement the original, failing one.  The restaurant was packed when I ate there last month, and while part of me felt I should be eating elsewhere, another part of me didn’t see anything wrong with walking into a vegan-friendly restaurant and putting my money on the menu that saved it, reminding the management that there was a reason for this revival.

Examples extend beyond just dining and grammar.  “You’re still wearing those leather shoes?”  “How can you call yourself vegan and shop at Whole Foods?”  “Do you have any idea how bad that vegan dessert is for you?”  “I can’t believe you aren’t donating to animal rights groups.”  “What do you mean you’ve never been to a protest?”  “Cheater.”  “You should volunteer more.”  “You should leaflet more.”  “You should speak out more.”  “You’re bad.  You’re a bad vegan.  You’re like, not even a vegan.”

And on.  And on.  And on.

In his conte moral, La Bégueule, Voltaire reminds us, “The perfect is the enemy of the good.”  Striving for perfection, albeit naïve, is of course a personal choice, one that does not, in theory, impose on others.  Dismissing or even attacking someone, however, for not being perfect—particularly for not meeting some arbitrarily crafted rubric of perfection—is wrong.  It is narrow, it is divisive, and it is futile.  It is complete nonsense and it in no way advances our education or our enjoyment for the lifestyle we advocate and admire.  Let us be better than this.  Let us find increasingly creative, intelligent, inspiring ways to motivate each other.  Let us be an example, reliable and dignified, for a slap in the face does nothing but sting.

Haikure, Ghosts, Superheroes & Phoney Baloney

Haikure is an Italian denim line with simple, classic style. Haikure also utilizes hemp, organic cotton, recycled poly, lyocell, tencel, linen and low-impact, plant-based dyes and aging processes. PLus, they have a really innovative tracking and transparency system in place that lets the buyer know the life-cycle and impacts of the purchase.

THE GHOSTS IN OUR MACHINE is a journey of discovery into what is a complex social dilemma. In essence, humans have cleverly categorized non-human animals into three parts: domesticated pets, wildlife, and the ones we don’t like to think about: the ghosts in our machine.”

Liberator_issue1cover-TimSeeleyMoCCAfest exclusive.  Cover art by Javier Sanchez Aranda, colors by Kathryn Mann

I grew up reading comic books which is why I’m so excited about LIBERATOR, a new series from Black Mask Studios where gritty antiheroes put the target on animal abusers and dog fighters. The comic book is a collaboration between Matt Miner & Vito Delsante. Go to the signing for Liberator #1! Visit any of the following links to pre-order online:

CLICK HERE to find your closest comic book store.
Pre-Order from Discount Comic Book Service (USA, ships internationally)
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Pre-Order from Things From Another World (USA, ships internationally)
Pre-Order from Forbidden Planet International

When I finally got to try Phoney Baloney’s coconut bacon, I went through half the bag by itself in the first 15 minutes! Needless to say, the smokey, savory, crispy flakes go great with everything from salads to cupcakes – but don’t forget to make a classic BLT. Check out Isa’s recipe for butterscotch cupcakes with coconut bacon, and Phoney Baloney’s own recipe for a BLTA